More white papers from PAR!

Last year we posted a blog about our commitment to provide our Customers with additional sources of information about our products through a series of white papers.

Since that time, we’ve released a number of new white papers that are available to you at no cost.

The Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function–Preschool Version (BRIEF-P). This resource helps readers learn about enhanced interpretation of the BRIEF-P, complete with illustrative case samples. You can find the new white paper under the Resources tab on the BRIEF-P page or via this direct link.

The Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI). This white paper provides you with insights into the creation and use of a research repository for the PAI. Customers can find the new white paper under the Resources tab on the PAI page or via this direct link.

The Self-Directed Search (VeteranSDS). This white paper explains how the VeteranSDS report and other tools can be used to assist military veterans transitioning to civilian careers. The new white paper can be found under the Resources tab on the SDS page or via this direct link.

The Feifer Assessment of Reading and the Feifer Assessment of Mathematics (FAR and FAM). This resource will help you learn more about using built-in skills, error, and behavior analyses to assist in the development of more effective reading and math interventions. To see this new white paper, go to the Resources tab on the FAR or FAM page, or use this direct link.

The PDD Behavior Inventory (PDDBI). A new white paper explains the process and rationale behind the release of the Spanish translation of the PDDBI Parent Form. The new white paper can be accessed under the Resources tab on the PDDBI page or via this direct link.

We hope you find that these documents enhance your use of our instruments. Watch for more white papers in the future!  

Multiple raters bring multiple perspectives

The Emotional Disturbance Decision Tree (EDDT) family of instruments gives you insight from three distinct viewpoints—teacher (EDDT), parent (EDDT-PF), and self (EDDT-SR). 

Though each form can be used individually, the full potential of the EDDT family is realized by garnering a trio of perspectives. See the advantages gained by in a case study presented in our new white paper by Jennifer A. Greene, PhD, and EDDT author Bryan L. Euler, PhD. You’ll also get information about the EDDT Multi-Rater Summary Form, a tool that can help you interpret statistically significant discrepancies between raters.

Learn more about the EDDT family.

Gain insight with PAR’s white papers

Because we publish our own assessment instruments, PAR has the advantage of being able to provide you with unique insights on our products that simply aren’t available anywhere else. This is exactly why we make white papers available to you—free of charge—for selected tests.

The following white papers are currently available to you:

The Autism Spectrum Disorder Decision Tree (ASD-DT) for the PDD Behavior Inventory (PDDBI). This resource helps readers use the products for screening and intervention planning. You can find the new white paper under the Resources tab on the PDDBI page or via this direct link.

The Development of the Academic Achievement Battery (AAB). This white paper provides you with insights and details on the AAB’s novel approach to reading comprehension. Customers can find the new white paper under the Resources tab on the AAB page or via this direct link.

The Emotional Disturbance Decision Tree (EDDT) family of rating forms. This document helps readers use the suite of products to gain multiple perspectives by comparing dyads or triads of raters. This white paper can be found via this direct link or under the Resources tab on the EDDT, EDDT-PF, and EDDT-SR product pages.

We’re happy to offer our Customers the additional insights available in these documents. We plan to offer you additional white papers in the future, so please watch for updates.

More resources for some favorite products!

In order to facilitate research using PAR products, we have begun offering comprehensive lists of research articles. These bibliographies are available through Mendeley, a free reference management tool. Products that offer these bibliographies will have a note on their product page with a link to their Mendeley bibliography. A PDF of the list will be available on the product’s resource tab.

After accessing the link, you will be prompted to create an account. Mendeley includes a desktop application and a cloud-based system for ease of use when finding references and citing them within a document. Use of this free resource is encouraged to facilitate research on the topics related to that particular assessment.

Currently, Mendeley bibliographies are available for the PDD Behavior Inventory (PDDBI), the Standard SDS, and the Student SDS. More will be added to the website soon!

Come join the discussion on our LinkedIn page!

Wouldn’t it be nice to have a group you could contact to discuss professional assessment products? We thought so too, so PAR has established a discussion group on our LinkedIn page!

Originally started as a group for our University Partnership Program, we’d like to invite all PAR Customers to join our group where you can ask questions about—or share your experiences with—our assessment products. The group is designed to encourage the discussion of academic uses, research pursuits, and assessment instruction using PAR proprietary instruments. Whether you are teaching students how to use assessment products and looking to share ideas with other instructors, using a PAR product and looking to connect with other users, or simply wanting to discuss assessments with other professionals, this group is an open forum for discussion on the use of PAR products. 

Join the discussion! https://www.linkedin.com/groups/8668065







Teachers, grad students: <br>PAR can help you!

PAR offers several ways that professors, students, and researchers can take advantage of special services and discounts!

Graduate students can qualify for a 40% discount on PAR proprietary products if they are conducting master’s thesis or dissertation research using any of our proprietary assessment instruments.

Furthermore, Customers who are conducting training with any of our proprietary assessment instruments in college or university measurement courses, internships, and/or clinical practicum programs can also qualify for a 40% discount on PAR products. Learn more about our research and training discounts.

Finally, PAR also offers the University Partnership Program, a concierge service for universities.

If you have any questions about training discounts or the University Partnership Program, contact Customer Support.

Here’s more reason to stick with your New Year’s resolution to exercise more: Increased cognitive performance is associated with exercise. According to Karen Postal, an instructor in psychology at Harvard Medical School, exercise has a positive effect on the brain, allowing people to think clearly and solve problems. However, not everyone wants to think about serious issues while exercising; instead, they want to escape their problems for a while. Postal states the best way to accomplish this is through high-intensity workouts: “When you have high exertion—meaning you are running flat-out in a race—you’re not going to be able to solve problems or think as well as when you are engaged in moderate exercise.” Dr. Miriam Nokia seems to agree, stating that high-intensity interval training is more stressful than moderate running.

Daydreaming is often seen as a negative trait, the opposite of being efficient and completing important tasks. However, Jerome L. Singer coined a term called positive constructive daydreaming, which refers to daydreaming that plays a constructive role in our lives. According to his research, daydreaming, imagination, and fantasy are essential to a healthy mental state. He attributes daydreaming to enhanced social skills, relief from boredom, and increased pleasure. Josie Glausiusz stated in an article in Psychology Today, “In one of those scientific switchbacks, daydreaming now appears to be a vital function of the psyche—a cauldron of creativity and an arena for rehearsing social skills. It may even be the backbone of our consciousness. Maybe what we all need is more time to let our minds meander.”

Runner Melissa Dahl admits to increasing her running intensity to allow time for her mind to meander. And according to statistics at Running USA, other runners are also showing a preference for fast running as opposed to moderate running. Some runners run because they need exercise, some run because they want to experience the euphoria called runner’s high, and others run to get away from it all. So those who want to let their minds roam free have only to strap on a pair of shoes and fly like the wind.

What kind of runner are you? PAR wants to hear from you, so leave your comments below.
The genre known as reality TV became popular in the early 2000s; however, it actually began in 1948 with Candid Camera. The Dating Game followed in 1965, That’s Incredible in 1980, and Cops in 1989. The 2000s gave us action reality shows like Survivor, Fear Factor, and The Amazing Race, and dating shows like The Bachelor and Who Wants to Marry a Multi-Millionaire. Talent competition shows later emerged, with shows like American Idol and Dancing With the Stars. Finally, an abundance of celebrity reality shows began, featuring people like Donald Trump, Tyra Banks, and the Kardashians.

Psychologists Steven Reiss and James Wiltz conducted a study called “Why People Watch Reality TV.” They asked 239 adults to rate how much they watched and enjoyed reality shows. They also had participants rate themselves on 16 basic motivations, which influence what people pay attention to and what they choose to do. However, basic motivations must continually be satisfied: once a person has eaten, hunger re-emerges; a person who enjoys arguing might pick a fight after a few days of no conflict. This theory suggests that people continually watch reality shows that satisfy their most important needs. The study also revealed status as a primary motivation for watching reality TV. Reiss and Wiltz concluded, “The more status-oriented people are, the more likely they are to view reality television and report pleasure and enjoyment.”

People watch reality shows for many reasons. Some are merely interested in the topic of the show; others enjoy getting a peek behind the scenes of a celebrity’s life. Reality shows answer questions such as: What is it like to participate in daring escapades? What is it like to win cash? What’s required to keep your home decluttered? How do you plan a wedding? What is it like to sing or dance in front of millions? Reality TV is also a way to escape the problems of life or fantasize about being famous. After all, the people on these shows often seem like normal, down to earth people. If they can be in the spotlight, if they can be rich, maybe someday we can be as well.

Although watching reality TV can be highly entertaining, an article on NPR.org cautions that watching such shows can impact real-life behavior. The constant intake of drama and negativity might not be healthy for viewers. Psychologist Bryan Gibson concluded that watching shows with high aggression can make people more aggressive in their real lives. This may be a good reason to avoid or at least limit watching shows with high levels of negative drama and violence.

What do you think about the effects of reality TV? PAR wants to hear from you, so leave your comments below.

 
You may think that the only people who were stressed out about the election were those who voted. However, according to new research, people who didn’t vote face a unique form of stress. According to Fast Company’s Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan, many people vote for an unexpressed reason: they are afraid others will judge them if they don’t.

People proudly display their “I voted” stickers as a subliminal implication that they “did the right thing” by exercising their civic responsibility. According to this study, many people feel pressured to lie about whether they voted. Those who didn’t vote may fear being asked whether they voted and may fear the reaction of their peers when they admit they didn’t. Additionally, a Harvard study indicates people may vote to avoid lying or to avoid feeling left out.

What do you think? Have you experienced or witnessed voting-related stress?
Dreams have long been the subject of intense scrutiny, and the subject of lucid dreams even more so. Lucid dreams can be defined as any experience within the dream in which you become aware you are dreaming. If we are asleep and become aware we are dreaming, what good does it do? Well, psychologists have conducted studies that have shown multiple benefits to lucid dreaming.

Ward Off Nightmares – Thanks to lucid dreaming, nightmares don’t have to be traumatic, dreaded experiences. Those who know they are dreaming can see threats for what they are—nonexistent. In the face of perceived danger, the knowledge that one is dreaming automatically relieves anxiety because the individual knows events aren’t really taking place and no harm can occur.

Enhance Creativity – Because the brain is very active and unconstrained during lucid dreaming cycles, it is more creative than at other times. This creativity carries over into the dreamer’s waking life, allowing for greater problem-solving ability and artistic expression.

Embrace Adventure – Dreams offer a level of adventure that often isn’t possible in real life. Due to the realization that one is in a dream, anything can occur. The traditional limits of time or laws of nature no longer need apply. Whatever can be imagined can be fulfilled, and the experience can be very freeing.

Learn or Practice Skills – Thinking about or visualizing a task enhances the ability to perform that task. Mental imagination uses the same muscles that would be used if the action were actually performed. A study on the effect of imagery revealed that imagined exercise produced significant elevations in systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen consumption.

Alleviate Depression – A study by the Department of Human Development at Cornell University revealed that the frequency of lucid dreaming is directly tied to depression. There is a positive link between lucid dreaming and how much control people feel they have over their lives. Because lucid dreaming gives one a sense of control while asleep, that same feeling of control can be felt while awake.

Lucid dreaming, like any skill, can be nurtured and developed. There are many techniques available for those who would like to learn or perfect the art of lucid dreaming. Lucid dreaming is a natural state when the conscious brain awakens during sleep, turning dreams into an alternate reality where all senses come to life, enabling one to do things limited only by their imagination.

Share your thoughts on lucid dreaming. PAR wants to hear from you, so leave a comment and join the conversation!