Choosing between the RAIT and the RAIT-NV

The Reynolds Adaptable Intelligence Test (RAIT) is a comprehensive intelligence test that measures crystallized intelligence, fluid intelligence, and quantitative aptitude or intelligence. It was designed to provide continuity of measurement across a wide age span and requires minimal reading skills and no motor coordination. It can be administered on paper or online via PARiConnect. The digital version allows the proctor to administer the full battery or abbreviated battery and automatically calculates a measure of effort. The timing for a full battery is 50 minutes and 30 minutes for the crystallized and fluid subtests.

The Reynolds Adaptable Intelligence Test Nonverbal (RAIT-NV) uses the two nonverbal subtests from the RAIT. The RAIT-NV is ideal for individuals with limited English proficiency or language skills. No reading skill, motor coordination, or visual–motor capabilities are required. It can be administered via by paper and pencil in individual settings or in a group format, making it ideal for use in human resources settings. The RAIT-NV can be administered in 20 minutes.

The RAIT is appropriate for use when looking for a comprehensive measure of intelligence, whereas the RAIT-NV is an ideal way to test intelligence in individuals with limited language capabilities.

PAR welcomes Terri Sisson to our sales team

We would like to introduce the newest member of PAR’s Sales team, Terri Sisson, EdS, our new educational assessment advisor. Terri brings a wealth of experience to PAR, with more than 20 years of experience in public schools as a licensed school psychologist and education specialist, as well as a university student instructor and supervisor.

In her national accounts role with PAR Sales, Terri will work with our largest school district customers to coordinate trainings about PAR instruments, answer questions, provide insight about how PAR instruments compare with competing assessment products, and work with districts to maximize their budgets during the ordering process.       

In addition to her public school service, Terri has held several leadership positions in the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) and is a past president and president elect of the Virginia Academy of School Psychologists (VASP). She was selected as the VASP School Psychologist of the Year in 2011 and was recently awarded the 2017-18 Community Partnership Award from James Madison University for her support of JMU graduate students.

We’re happy to welcome Terri to the PAR family and we’re confident our Customers will enjoy working with her!

Sometimes a screener is just what you need

A key part of meeting the needs of your clients is choosing the appropriate assessment instrument. Some clients may present with specific symptoms that clearly lead you to a full assessment vehicle. Other instances may not be so clear cut. In those situations, a screening test can be the best starting point.

One of the biggest advantages of screening tests is the ability to confirm or rule out specific issues. They can also save you time and money versus administering a full assessment product.

PAR offers a total of 37 screening, short, and abbreviated forms that cover a variety of constructs. The full list is as follows:

Please note that for some products, you may have to go to the parent product page, as not all screeners have their own web page. With so many to choose from, we’re confident that we have a screening instrument to meet your needs.


 

ASCA: On the way to LA!

Will you be attending the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) Conference in Los Angeles? PAR will be attending ASCA's Reach for the Stars Conference from July 14 through 17. Be sure to stop by the booth to take advantage of the 15% conference discount and free ground shipping. Not only that, but we will also be giving out free Self-Directed Search (SDS) sample packs at the booth. It's a great time to stop by to ask any questions, get a hands-on look at new products, or find out more about your old favorites.

We can't wait to see you, so be sure to stop by and say hello!

Now available: Two trauma screening forms for children!

For children, experiencing a traumatic event—such as physical or sexual abuse, neglect, victimization by a peer, the death of a parent, witnessing a violent act, experiencing a natural disaster, and more—can have devastating and lasting psychological effects.

According to the National Children’s Alliance, child abuse victims experience trauma symptoms like fear, sleep disturbances, anxiety, and depression at rates verging on those experienced by war veterans. In addition, they are more likely to perform poorly in school, have behavior problems at home, and, left untreated, have poor long-term mental and physical health.

Getting these children the help and healing they need has historically relied on the results of a forensic interview. However, clinical intake evaluation results can vary based on the clinician’s training and experience, and the time involved in administering and scoring standardized tests often precludes their use in settings like children’s advocacy centers, which see large numbers of children in relatively short periods of time.

The Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children (TSCC) Screening Form and Trauma Symptom Checklist for Young Children (TSCYC) Screening Form were developed based on a critical need for standardized screening measures that can quickly evaluate trauma symptomology and risk in children who have experienced abuse or trauma.

The one-page carbonless screening forms, which are also available in Spanish, take just 5 minutes to administer and score and can be used to assist practitioners in the field with the treatment referral process.

Derived from the full-form TSCC (a 54-item self-report for youth ages 8 to 17 years) and TSCYC (a 90-item caretaker report for children ages 3 to 12 years), both the TSCC and TSCYC screening forms include 12 items and two subscales—General Trauma and Sexual Concerns—that are scored separately. Selected items were best at predicting overall trauma and sexual-related symptomology within their respective normative samples on the full forms.

These new TSCC and TSCYC screening forms are reliable and valid measures that quickly indicate whether a child or youth is at risk for a clinically significant psychological disturbance. This helps clinicians determine the need for follow-up testing and can help children get on the path toward healing.